Open relationships: why are you so closed?

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And what if I still want to have sex with other people while remaining in a loving, committed relationship to one person? 
Does this make me a bad person, even if I’m being honest and doing it with integrity? 
Does the inability to fit into a monogamous model mean I am “broken”? The impact of cultural and ancestral conditioning runs deep, often causing our deepest and purest desires to go unexpressed. 
Suppressing ourselves might seem harmless at first, especially when faced with the fear of ‘rejection from the tribe’. That suppression, however, often means we are stepping away from our true selves, from our original divine essence. 
Worst of all, it can make us feel lost, alone, even dead, leading us to seek aliveness in ways that are inconvenient, unnecessary, and perhaps even harmful: infidelity, addictions, self-harming or other types of numbing. 
So whether the topic of polyamory is of interest to one or not, it can be rewarding to open our curiosity to other ways of perceiving relationships which may stand out from our normal cultural context. 
As a collective, we owe it to ourselves and to each other to create spaces of non-judgement and open-mindedness in which our purest and most authentic desires can be voiced, expressed and explored, leading us to reach a more expanded and evolved version of ourselves. 
So, go ahead and enjoy that 4-hand massage while your girlfriend (or boyfriend) watches, if that is your truth. Unlock the courage and the freedom to be the fullest expression of yourself. 
Join @revgoddess and I for our next online workshop Energy, Sex & Money; exploring different ways of removing our barriers in these areas of our lives. 

Marc Peridis