THE SACRED
TRANSFORMATIVE
JOURNEY
 

ARTICLE 22
THE CROSS

LET'S GET CONTROVERSIAL


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In 1514, at a Holy Friday feast, Pope Leo 10 made an infamously damaging statement which, unbeknownst to him, would end up recorded in the notebooks of many attendees. 

Raising a chalice of wine into the air, he would have toasted: 
"How well we know what a profitable superstition this fable of Christ has been for us and our predecessors." 

The comment, which has apparently been craftily swept under the rug by the Vatican since, was apparently referring to the death of Jesus Christ on the cross and how the church would continue to profit from this regardless of it being a lie.  According to some researchers and historians, it seems that Jesus would have dodged the death sentence, whilst Simon Of Cyrene took his place, fooling the Romans.

As well as this statement, others have shown precise evidence that in fact Jesus Christ did not die on a cross and that, at the time, crosses were not used for crucifixion at all.

So, if Jesus Christ didn't in fact die on the cross, why would this symbol used so widely in Christianity? Apparently for the same reason the oldest cathedrals and churches were built on old pagan sites. As the cross was already so widely used by other cultures, the church knew that using it would be an easy way to convert other cultures to the faith. 

Today, the cross is widely used across the Christian church to remind us of persecution and punishment: That Jesus died on the cross for his sins and for all of ours. 

As a symbol it has engrained in us a sense of disempowerment: that we can not trust what is within us.
That we must follow the collective, but only those who are abiding these rules dictated by the scriptures. And if we fail to, we too will end up on a cross. 

The truth is that, long before Jesus “died on the cross”, it was already being used in many cultures and civilisations in very different ways, and exploring these can actually open us up to empowerment and growth.

Ancient uses of the cross:
When the Spaniards arrived in Mesoamerica and found the ancient temples of the Maya and Aztecs, they were shocked to find the temples adorned with many, sometimes hundreds, of crosses. 
The pyramid of the magicians in Uxmal, for instance, boasts 484. Why were crosses already so present in this culture which, until then , was unaware of the existence of Christ at all?

For the Maya
The cross carried many representations for the Maya. 
In the classic Maya era, the cross symbolised the meeting of two components that could only be found in a man's sperm, therefore representing creation, birth, life. 

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Before that, in the earlier Maya era, which the classic era inherited, they believed the cross represented a sort of antenna which was located at the top of human heads, connecting them to the divine. We often find in the Mayan temples images depicting odd tall and large shapes on top of initiates heads. This symbolises the connection between their head and the divine . 

The cross symbolised the crossing of four points they believed which exist in our heads which connect us to the divine. 
One line crossing from the pineal gland to the third eye, and another going from left to right crossing it. 

 

 

 
 

In ancient Egypt

Even much before that, the cross appeared thousands of years ago in the time of Egyptian pharaohs who used the cross on temple sites to indicate the crossing of two energy lines, or an energy line with a ley line. Remember, it is at the crossing of these lines that energy hot spots exist, and thus, where access to source is gained. 

In temple-making

Ancient temple making cultures also believed that the cross represented the meeting of the four cardinal points and the four elements they related: earth, wind, fire, water. And as we know, the marriage and the balance of these four symbols is essential to the building of a temple or the balanced chi of a space. 

Sacred geometry
And probably the oldest and most primordial representation of the cross of all, is related to the universe's sacred geometry. 
When God began to create the Earth, he apparently started with a simple point (he had to start somewhere...) 
Led by a need to turn this point into a 3D shape, he drew a line going down that point and a line crossing it. As he drew circles around these lines, the sphere that represents the union of these shapes is the shape which became our earth. The cross is therefore one of the starting points of the earth.

As a result, the cross has been commonly linked to the worship of nature and pagan sex rites by historians and researchers.

 


GET STARTED.
 

So, if we review these above principles, there are many reasons we would want to bring the cross into our sacred spaces

Lets recap: 
Over history the cross has represented 

  • Fertility, birth and creativity in the classic Mayan era.
  • Our personal connection to the divine in earlier Mayan cultures
  • The connection of telluric lines which create earths hot spots and access to source, in the time of the Pharaohs of Egypt 
  • The marriage and balance of the main earths elements, by temple-making cultures, 
  • The initial point of the sacred geometry of creation, the source of all. 

All of these are aligned with the principles of temple making and building a sacred space. 

First choose which ones relate to your objectives and begin to reflect on your general relationship to the cross.
Sit in meditation and reflect on these different symbolisms of the cross and the ones which are most significant for you and your space. 
Then, after this, walk around your space and survey to have a look at where you feel a cross would work. 
Traditional uses of the cross are over the door to protect from harm, over the bed, on the side of the bed with a rosary, or at the altar. 

You can also find some alternative and more fashionable ways of using the cross, for instance in prints , on wallpapers or rugs, cushions or upholstery fabrics. 
Perhaps even as a fun pattern for your wooden floorboards. 

Get creative with this. 

Some examples of how the cross symbol can be used in untraditional ways in flooring, upholstery, rugs, etc.


But the most important step is to start by removing the conditioning we have around it and begin to see it as the powerful symbol it truly is. 

And the true work happens as we begin to shift our perception and the energy it currently carries to a new energy, we begin to shift it for the entire world. 

Including those around us! 

And of course, as usual, ENJOY!